Trespass. An environmental history of modern migrations

by Marco Armiero In a new book, Marco Armiero and Richard Tucker have edited together important contributions to the emerging field of the environmental history of modern migrations. Three main 'styles' of research delineate the contours of a timely research effort. Histories in the Present Tense We are in the midst of a massive migration … Continue reading Trespass. An environmental history of modern migrations

(Un)Thinking Science: A critical call for conscious practical work

by Epifania Akosua Amoo-Adare* The politics of “who, where, what, why and how” we do scholarship are critical and foundational concerns for doing what Epifania Akosua Amoo-Adare describes as an (un)thinking of science.     In today’s world, scientific knowledge producers are significantly implicated in neoliberal imaginaries and certain concomitant processes of knowledge production. These constructed ways … Continue reading (Un)Thinking Science: A critical call for conscious practical work

In-between political ecology and STS: A methodological provocation

By Duygu Kaşdoğan* The traffic between political ecology (PE) and science and technology studies (STS) has given importance to more-than-human actors and political materialities to understand the connections between nature, culture and capital. But what would the methods for cross-scale studies informed by PE and STS look like? The interactions between PE and STS have … Continue reading In-between political ecology and STS: A methodological provocation

Deconstructing public health: a case from the Mekong Delta

The socio-political nature of disease can be silenced, especially when there is a lack of strong civil society networks and/or scientific data to help reclaim public health. Relevant and effective responses to disease can only emerge with the involvement of people whose health is at stake and through contextualised, historicised and politicised health studies.  * … Continue reading Deconstructing public health: a case from the Mekong Delta

Political ecology syllabus for postgraduates

A political ecology syllabus for post-graduates, based on courses offered during ENTITLE, and designed for a taught course or for self-study, is now freely available online.  This post-graduate syllabus is the product of training events in political ecology, specifically summer schools and Special Intensive Courses (SIC) conducted within the ENTITLE FP7 Initial Training Network project. … Continue reading Political ecology syllabus for postgraduates

Using art to study and communicate socio-environmental change in areas of land grabbing

By Emma Li Johansson* Art in research is a powerful tool to evoke feelings and actions beyond academia. This researcher set out to see what is possible when mixing research with artistic ways of expression. A picture says more than a thousand words, they say. Which is why art is a good way to inform … Continue reading Using art to study and communicate socio-environmental change in areas of land grabbing

Reflecting on emotional political ecologies

By Maria Heras, Benedict Singleton and Panagiota Kotsila* Why are the affective and the emotional still not recognised and dealt with as core, essential dimensions in political ecology? Three researchers share their thoughts about a roundtable discussion on “Emotional Political Ecologies” during the ENTITLE Undisciplined Environments Conference, held in Stockholm from 20-24 March 2016. The … Continue reading Reflecting on emotional political ecologies

The Titanic, a lifeboat, or the Bounty? Or why class still matters in the Anthropocene

“Arrogant and short-sighted leadership; distracted people dancing on the boat; and poor preparation for the catastrophe”. Marco Armiero discusses three narratives of the Anthropocene and why the stories we tell are so important. In the end, it does not matter how well equipped or prepared the boat is; only mutiny can change its course.   A mutiny, a … Continue reading The Titanic, a lifeboat, or the Bounty? Or why class still matters in the Anthropocene

Upcoming in Stockholm: International Conference “Undisciplined Environments”

Around 400 scholars, activists and artists will gather in Stockholm from 20th to 24th March to discuss the possibilities for a political ecology beyond disciplinary boundaries. The conference will be a place for intercultural exchanges on Indigenous ecologies and resistance. The ENTITLE Blog collective will be reporting on some of the main events.  The European Network … Continue reading Upcoming in Stockholm: International Conference “Undisciplined Environments”

What does virtual water conceal?

By María J. Beltrán. Virtual water and water footprint studies, when disembedded from all institutional and political processes alter our understanding of ecosystems,  from complex systems thinking toward simple flow analysis. The concept of ‘virtual water’ was defined by Professor Tony Allan in the early 1990s. It is a revolutionary concept because it describes something … Continue reading What does virtual water conceal?