Italian eco-narratives – Paths into the nationalisation of forests

by Roberta Biasillo and Marco Armiero What if we let Italy talk through its forests? What if we unfold Italian history through its forests? Today’s blog discusses Italian forest narratives and how they may be read. This article was originally published on whitehorsepress and is inspired by an article published in Environment and History. "That Italy’s … Continue reading Italian eco-narratives – Paths into the nationalisation of forests

Into the fascist forest – a real Italian controversy

by Wilko Graf von Hardenberg and Marco Armiero Can a forest be fascist? This may seem a facetious question, but it is one that Italians have been discussing of late due to a fire that occurred at the end of August 2017. This article was originally published on The Conversation. The fire, allegedly started accidently … Continue reading Into the fascist forest – a real Italian controversy

“Down with the fumes!” The Year of the Shootings and its relevance for mining today

by Félix Talego and Juan Diego Pérez On February 4, 1888, a demonstration called by the “League Against Calcinations” to protest against acid rain ended up with a massacre of civilians by the Spanish army. Researchers Félix Talego and Juan Diego Pérez argue that the commemoration of this event is an opportunity to spread the … Continue reading “Down with the fumes!” The Year of the Shootings and its relevance for mining today

Trespass. An environmental history of modern migrations

by Marco Armiero In a new book, Marco Armiero and Richard Tucker have edited together important contributions to the emerging field of the environmental history of modern migrations. Three main 'styles' of research delineate the contours of a timely research effort. Histories in the Present Tense We are in the midst of a massive migration … Continue reading Trespass. An environmental history of modern migrations

Toxic Bios: A guerrilla narrative project mapping contamination, illness and resistance

by Ilenia Iengo and Marco Armiero By bringing to the fore the affective, bodily and narrative dimensions of environmental injustices, the project Toxic Bios aims to open new paths of collaborative research and grassroots activism focused on "guerrilla narratives" and counter-hegemonic storytelling Toxic Bios is a Public Environmental Humanities project based at KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory in … Continue reading Toxic Bios: A guerrilla narrative project mapping contamination, illness and resistance

On ‘the Political’ in Environmental History

By Stefania Barca* Like all history writing—and much of science-making itself—environmental history cannot help but be political. Stefania Barca reflects on the political implications of what environmental historians do. “Only mass social movements can save us now.” Naomi Klein makes this point in This Changes Everything, and I couldn’t agree more. Since their emergence in … Continue reading On ‘the Political’ in Environmental History

Fault Lines – Earthquakes and Urbanism in Modern Italy

By Giuseppe Forino* In his recently published book Fault Lines, Giacomo Parrinello delves into the environmental history of two major earthquakes in Sicily in the last century, allowing the earthquakes to narrate a fascinating journey into the dynamics and continuities between urban modernization and reconstruction efforts before and after the disasters. Sicily is one of … Continue reading Fault Lines – Earthquakes and Urbanism in Modern Italy

Of the Titanic, the Bounty, and Other Shipwrecks

By Marco Armiero* In this essay, environmental historian Marco Armiero presents three metaphors of the Anthropocene and discusses why words, and class, still matter. Periodically humans have to pay for their sins. Last time that a more than human entity asked them to pay the bill, it was the Deluge. Maybe everything starts from there. It … Continue reading Of the Titanic, the Bounty, and Other Shipwrecks

The road as a commons: An interview with James Longhurst, author of “Bike Battles” (2015)

As cyclists struggle to recover their space in the roads, conflicts involving bicycles are attracting more and more attention. Thinking of the road as a commons, as proposed by environmental historian James Longhurst in his new book Bike Battles: A History of Sharing the American Road, may give an entry point to a political ecology perspective.  James Longhurst, … Continue reading The road as a commons: An interview with James Longhurst, author of “Bike Battles” (2015)

“Liquid Power”: An interview with Erik Swyngedouw

Erik Swyngedouw, Professor of Geography at the University of Manchester, on his new book, research experiences in Spain, Spanish literary inspirations and next research project. For most (urban) political ecologists, Erik Swyngedouw needs little introduction. Erik is a prolific writer and inspiring intellectual whose research over the past decades has focused on geographical political economy,  … Continue reading “Liquid Power”: An interview with Erik Swyngedouw