Saskia Sassen on extractive logics and geographies of expulsion

By Gustavo García López* Saskia Sassen (Professor of Sociology, Columbia University) argues that the foundational transformation of capitalism since the 1980s is dominated by a speculative and extractive logic, characterized by “predatory formations” such as vulture funds making cities of ‘dead buildings’ and peripheries of expelled people. In her recent keynote speech at the  16th … Continue reading Saskia Sassen on extractive logics and geographies of expulsion

Climate politics in the long run

By Romain Felli*.  Stephen Schneider’s 1976 book The Genesis Strategy offers a stunning preview of contemporary debates over climate policies.   According to philosopher of science Bruno Latour, the rise of climate scepticism in public debates reflects the lack of political engagement from climate scientists. He argues that, having restrained themselves to a discourse of … Continue reading Climate politics in the long run

Patrick Bond: Climate justice movements need to hit Trump where it hurts most

By Ethemcan Turhan and Cem İskender Aydın * Political economist and climate justice expert Patrick Bond comments on the prospects for a progressive anti-capitalist agenda in the face of increasing alt-right populism, xenophobia, climate denialism and economic-political exceptionalism.  So we are back to square one: Trump’s withdrawal from Paris Agreement in early June 2017 has … Continue reading Patrick Bond: Climate justice movements need to hit Trump where it hurts most

Pará, bloody Pará

Even when the police doesn’t kill in Pará, Brazil, it still lets others do the killing. The coup and the political power of the rural sector in Brasília have provided Amazonian gunmen with a carte blanche. We are living in times of death. The massacre of nine men and one woman in Pau D'Arco, on … Continue reading Pará, bloody Pará

Planting the seeds of degrowth in times of crisis – Examples from Greece – Part II

By Marula Tsagkari * In the second of a two-part series, Marula Tsagkari explores how today, we are participants in a complex and severe crisis, and a radical crisis requires radical solutions. Through a number of examples it became obvious that in Greece there is groundwork for a transition to sustainable degrowth. There are seeds … Continue reading Planting the seeds of degrowth in times of crisis – Examples from Greece – Part II

Planting the seeds of degrowth in times of crisis – Examples from Greece – Part I

By Marula Tsagkari * At the same time that the degrowth movement was gaining ground in the public discourse, Greece, was living the most severe economic recession since the Second World War. In the Chinese language the word crisis is represented by two symbols. The first means danger and, the second, opportunity. We must look for … Continue reading Planting the seeds of degrowth in times of crisis – Examples from Greece – Part I

Tania Murray Li: There is no one trajectory of development

The world’s global institutions and governments with decision power on the future of millions of people living in rural areas want to continue with business as usual: industrialization and urbanization. Number two of a two-part video interview with Tania Murray Li. Tania Murray Li, Professor of Anthropology, Canada Research Chair in the Political-Economy and Culture of … Continue reading Tania Murray Li: There is no one trajectory of development

Tania Murray Li: The agricultural story is not over

Tania Murray Li talks about how and why political ecology should still focus on rural spaces and transformations. Tania Murray Li, Professor of Anthropology, Canada Research Chair in the Political-Economy and Culture of Asia, and Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Toronto, reflects on why and how political ecology should place more attention on … Continue reading Tania Murray Li: The agricultural story is not over

The Banality of the Anthropocene

By Heather Anne Swanson* There are plenty of troubling things about the Anthropocene, but one of its most troubling dimensions is the sheer number of people it fails to trouble. In response, we need to trouble the Anthropocene's banality, argues Heather Ann Swanson. I want to propose an Anthropocene territorialization and a subject-making project in … Continue reading The Banality of the Anthropocene

Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part II)

By Leandro Vergara-Camus* In the Part II of the third post of the Ecology after capitalism series, Leandro Vergara-Camus attempts to show that Marxism is useful for the degrowth movement because of its understanding of what the specificity of capitalism is in comparison to other types of societies. In order to build a post-capitalist society, … Continue reading Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part II)