Green Gentrification: book review and research provocations

García-Lamarca reviews Gould and Lewis’s new book and highlights three missing and important topics for future research on green gentrification. Does greening whiten? Does greening richen? Does greening raise rents and housing prices? These are the three core questions behind Kenneth A. Gould and Tammy L. Lewis’s new book titled Green Gentrification: Urban sustainability and … Continue reading Green Gentrification: book review and research provocations

Renewing cooperation on water: what hope for the two-state solution?

By Jan Selby* A new agreement between Israel and the Palestinian Authority gives Israel carte blanche to expand water provision for illegal settlements. 15 January, on the very same day that diplomats from 70 countries were meeting in Paris to reaffirm their support for the two-state solution, Israeli and Palestinian officials announced that they were … Continue reading Renewing cooperation on water: what hope for the two-state solution?

Weaving musical spaces of indigenous resistance for environmental justice

By Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares* The author proposes a journey to explore environmental justice movements through music amongst indigenous peoples from all over the world. Environmental protest songs enact different ways of telling that can connect ecological, political, spiritual and place-based meanings of environmental issues in  unanticipated ways. Through history, protest songs have shown to be a … Continue reading Weaving musical spaces of indigenous resistance for environmental justice

Punk, not cool. Assessing the degrowth debate

By Emanuele Leonardi * Leonardi reviews Giorgos Kallis’ new book “In defense of degrowth”, a volume that provides activists and academics alike with a detailed map of the degrowth discourse, with its theoretical controversies and opportunities for political alliances to come. What struck me first and foremost in the process of reading In defense of degrowth … Continue reading Punk, not cool. Assessing the degrowth debate

The boomerang of green gentrification: an interview with Isabelle Anguelovski

By Michele Catanzaro* The creation of city parks, green belts and ecological corridors in urban neighbourhoods attracts upmarket estate agencies and new residents with more purchasing power than longstanding residents. The rise in housing prices pushes the original population out: a frustrating phenomenon known as “green gentrification”. Barcelona’s Parc del Poblenou is the kind of … Continue reading The boomerang of green gentrification: an interview with Isabelle Anguelovski

Going for “the simpler way”

By Ted Trainer* In his contribution to the series Ecology after capitalism, Ted Trainer argues that ecosocialism is not the answer and calls for the left and degrowthers to embrace all the radical implications of the "limits to growth" analysis. This implies following "the simpler way", his own proposal for achieving a post-capitalist society based … Continue reading Going for “the simpler way”

Who can say? Reflections on the unknown in Valle de Cauca, Colombia

By Emma Lord* On December 1st, 2016, headlines marked the formal end of Colombia´s prolonged war. Emma Lord shares some reflections on the contextual complexity of the conflict based on fieldwork in the department of Valle del Cauca in 2015. Sitting in the kitchen of a caleño guitarist –a research informant and friend– we chat … Continue reading Who can say? Reflections on the unknown in Valle de Cauca, Colombia

Valor, crecimiento y desarrollo: lecciones desde America del Sur para una nueva ecopolitica

Por Eduardo Gudynas* En el cuarto y ultimo post de la serie Ecology after capitalism, Eduardo Gudynas escribe sobre las propuestas del Buen Vivir desde America del Sur. Estas no sólo rechazan el crecimiento como fin en sí mismo, sino que se desentienden de la idea de desarrollo en cualquiera de sus expresiones.  Ante la … Continue reading Valor, crecimiento y desarrollo: lecciones desde America del Sur para una nueva ecopolitica

Xingu, the clamor coming from the forest in Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival

By Barbara Arisi & Felipe Milanez * Much to the chagrin of ranchers and agribusiness, one of Rio de Janeiro’s popular samba schools, Imperatriz Leopoldinense, is making visible the terrible consequences of agribusiness and hydropower dams on the Xingu Indigenous Park in this year’s Carnival. It’s the biggest party on earth. The greatest multitude of … Continue reading Xingu, the clamor coming from the forest in Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival

Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part II)

By Leandro Vergara-Camus* In the Part II of the third post of the Ecology after capitalism series, Leandro Vergara-Camus attempts to show that Marxism is useful for the degrowth movement because of its understanding of what the specificity of capitalism is in comparison to other types of societies. In order to build a post-capitalist society, … Continue reading Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part II)