Indigenous Science

On 22 April 2017, the March for Science will be held in Washington, D.C. and over 500 other cities across the world. ENTITLEblog endorses the call by original peoples and their allies to march not just for Science but for Sciences; to acknowledge the multiple other ways of knowing that play an essential role in … Continue reading Indigenous Science

The Banality of the Anthropocene

By Heather Anne Swanson* There are plenty of troubling things about the Anthropocene, but one of its most troubling dimensions is the sheer number of people it fails to trouble. In response, we need to trouble the Anthropocene's banality, argues Heather Ann Swanson. I want to propose an Anthropocene territorialization and a subject-making project in … Continue reading The Banality of the Anthropocene

Tackling Trumpism with Bourdieu and Gramsci

By Shozab Raza* Shozab Raza proposes to read Bourdieu and Gramsci together to envisage an anti-trumpist counter-hegemonic turn. Donald Trump’s election reminded me, yet again, just how inconsequential our activities as academics are to the trajectory of national politics (and not only in the United States). The gap between what goes on in the “academic … Continue reading Tackling Trumpism with Bourdieu and Gramsci

Renewing cooperation on water: what hope for the two-state solution?

By Jan Selby* A new agreement between Israel and the Palestinian Authority gives Israel carte blanche to expand water provision for illegal settlements. 15 January, on the very same day that diplomats from 70 countries were meeting in Paris to reaffirm their support for the two-state solution, Israeli and Palestinian officials announced that they were … Continue reading Renewing cooperation on water: what hope for the two-state solution?

Weaving musical spaces of indigenous resistance for environmental justice

By Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares* The author proposes a journey to explore environmental justice movements through music amongst indigenous peoples from all over the world. Environmental protest songs enact different ways of telling that can connect ecological, political, spiritual and place-based meanings of environmental issues in  unanticipated ways. Through history, protest songs have shown to be a … Continue reading Weaving musical spaces of indigenous resistance for environmental justice

Going for “the simpler way”

By Ted Trainer* In his contribution to the series Ecology after capitalism, Ted Trainer argues that ecosocialism is not the answer and calls for the left and degrowthers to embrace all the radical implications of the "limits to growth" analysis. This implies following "the simpler way", his own proposal for achieving a post-capitalist society based … Continue reading Going for “the simpler way”

Valor, crecimiento y desarrollo: lecciones desde America del Sur para una nueva ecopolitica

Por Eduardo Gudynas* En el cuarto y ultimo post de la serie Ecology after capitalism, Eduardo Gudynas escribe sobre las propuestas del Buen Vivir desde America del Sur. Estas no sólo rechazan el crecimiento como fin en sí mismo, sino que se desentienden de la idea de desarrollo en cualquiera de sus expresiones.  Ante la … Continue reading Valor, crecimiento y desarrollo: lecciones desde America del Sur para una nueva ecopolitica

Xingu, the clamor coming from the forest in Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival

By Barbara Arisi & Felipe Milanez * Much to the chagrin of ranchers and agribusiness, one of Rio de Janeiro’s popular samba schools, Imperatriz Leopoldinense, is making visible the terrible consequences of agribusiness and hydropower dams on the Xingu Indigenous Park in this year’s Carnival. It’s the biggest party on earth. The greatest multitude of … Continue reading Xingu, the clamor coming from the forest in Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival

Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part II)

By Leandro Vergara-Camus* In the Part II of the third post of the Ecology after capitalism series, Leandro Vergara-Camus attempts to show that Marxism is useful for the degrowth movement because of its understanding of what the specificity of capitalism is in comparison to other types of societies. In order to build a post-capitalist society, … Continue reading Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part II)

Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part I)

By Leandro Vergara-Camus* In the third post of the Ecology after capitalism series, divided in Part I and Part II, Leandro Vergara-Camus argues that the root causes of the socially and ecologically destructive character of capitalism is not to be found in growth, but in capitalist accumulation. He suggests that growth can be greened in … Continue reading Capitalism, democracy, and the degrowth horizon (Part I)