In-between Political Ecology and STS: A Methodological Provocation

Ernst Haeckel's interpretation of several ascidians from Kunstformen der Natur, 1904

By Duygu Kaşdoğan* The traffic between political ecology (PE) and science and technology studies (STS) has given importance to more-than-human actors and political materialities to understand the connections between nature, culture and capital. But what would the methods for cross-scale studies informed by PE and STS look like? The interactions between PE and STS have … Continue reading In-between Political Ecology and STS: A Methodological Provocation

Agroecología: ¿institucionalizando la alternativa?

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By Inés Morales Bernardos, Jon Sanz Landaluze y Marian Simón Rojo* La irrupción de las candidaturas populares, alimentadas por gentes de los movimientos sociales, ha abierto en el movimiento agroecológico nuevas perspectivas de interacción con las instituciones. No veremos una revuelta del pan en nuestras calles. Ser parte, incluso como convidado modesto, del “club de … Continue reading Agroecología: ¿institucionalizando la alternativa?

How’s that for an ending? A political ecology of apocalypse

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By Jonathan Coward* Warnings over climate change are often dressed in the language of apocalypse, but is well-intentioned alarmism having the required effect? “Suddenly there is an earthquake. Suddenly the sea floods the city, pouring down through the mouths into the corridors of council and institute and short-circuiting everything... How’s that for an ending?” “These … Continue reading How’s that for an ending? A political ecology of apocalypse

Hurricane Matthew is just the latest unnatural disaster to strike Haiti

Hurricane Matthew crosses Haiti as a category 4 storm. EPA/2016 EUMETSAT

By Jason von Meding and Giuseppe Forino* In the wake of hurricane Matthew, destruction and suffering in Haiti has returned to the headlines. If we don't acknowledge that the roots of risk and vulnerability lie in colonial history and structural injustice we will see this happening again and again. At least 1,000 people were killed … Continue reading Hurricane Matthew is just the latest unnatural disaster to strike Haiti

True colors of the USA: personal reflections on race and the American elections

Racial Monopoly by Stephanie Loveless

by Stephanie Loveless* Racial issues have taken central stage during the US presidential elections. Understanding race as a fundamental dimension of any struggle for justice, it is critical to not only assess candidates' past and present racial politics but also to consider one's own racial positioning on the eve of the vote. I live in Europe but … Continue reading True colors of the USA: personal reflections on race and the American elections

Encountering Arturo Escobar

Cover of Encountering Development. Source: Princeton University Press

By Isabella M. Radhuber* Workshops were recently held in Barcelona with Arturo Escobar to discuss two of his key texts. Isabella shares some important reflections on the social and political role of researchers, what it means to place oneself as an academic and how we, more broadly, understand and relate with the world. I felt … Continue reading Encountering Arturo Escobar

Naming the radical movement for alternative economics: D.E.growth

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By Miklós Antal* How can we create a positive attitude towards alternative economic directions while keeping the advantages of the concept of degrowth? In a recent article with Stefan Drews in the journal Ecological Economics, we discussed why degrowth might be an unfortunate name and slogan for the alternative economics movement. We listed several expressions … Continue reading Naming the radical movement for alternative economics: D.E.growth

The challenges of doing engaged research

Tucson residents gather at a rally outside the utility’s headquarters, calling for fair rates that incentivize solar. Author: Remy Franklin.

By Remy Franklin* How can we make our research relevant while navigating the politics of scientific neutrality? Reflections on the ethical and methodological messiness of practicing engaged geography. It was a morning in early May when I opened my computer to find an email back from the Institutional Review Board providing comments on my application … Continue reading The challenges of doing engaged research

Accelerationism… and degrowth? Strange bedfellows for today’s left

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By Aaron Vansintjan* Proponents of degrowth and accelerationism will likely be found in the same room for decades to come. Despite their opposite ‘branding’, they should probably talk; they have a lot to learn from each other. For the past little while I’ve been involved with a group in Barcelona, which studies and advocates ‘degrowth’: … Continue reading Accelerationism… and degrowth? Strange bedfellows for today’s left

A political ecology of EU energy infrastructure: The Shannon LNG Terminal in Ireland

LNG terminal at Brunnsvik Holmen in Nynashamn (Sweden). Beginning operation in March 2011, the terminal is the first of the Baltic Sea and has a storage capacity of 20 000 m3.

By Patrick Bresnihan* Insights from the development of a Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal in Ireland illustrate how energy provision is always embedded in wider networks, which connect geographies, finance, state and private interests. Opposition must not just focus on the point of extraction, but on the wider political and economic relationships that enable certain forms … Continue reading A political ecology of EU energy infrastructure: The Shannon LNG Terminal in Ireland